Self-Assessment Tools

Following the approval of the new California Quality Standards for Expanded Learning, an additional document called A Crosswalk Between was created to link the Quality Standards and various program assessment tools. For additional information on self-assessments, see CDE's A Crosswalk Between alignment document.

The California Afterschool Network Quality Assessment Tool (CAN-QSA) can be used for self-assessment and program improvement purposes. It is not appropriate for use by external assessors or for formal program evaluation. The tool is designed for use in afterschool programs serving youth in grades K-12 in either school or community-based settings. It can be used to engage a range of program stakeholders (i.e., staff, school administrators, youth, families) in a reflective process regarding program quality and to generate a concrete action plan to enhance program quality. The tool can be used both at the site level and programmatic level. Guidance for using the tool is provided in a comprehensive user manual. 

The California Afterschool Network Quality Self-Assessment Rubric (CAN-QSAR) can be used for self-assessment and program improvement purposes. It is designed for use specifically in afterschool programs serving youth in grades 9-12 in either school or community-based settings. It can be used to engage a range of program stakeholders (i.e., program staff, participants, and school administration) in a reflective process regarding program quality and to generate a concrete action plan to enhance program quality and guide professional development. This tool can be used both at the individual site and programmatic level.

The New York State Afterschool Network Program Quality Self-Assessment Tool (NYSAN-QSA)  can be used for self-assessment and program improvement purposes only. Users are encouraged to use the tool in conjunction with external evaluation to provide more rigorous evaluation of program quality and youth outcomes. The tool is designed for use specifically in afterschool programs serving youth in grades K-12 in either school or community-based settings. The intended use of the tool is to promote program quality and engage staff, youth and other stakeholders in discussions about how to continuously improve their program. The tool can be used both at the individual site level and the programmatic level. 

The Program Quality Assessment (PQA) was developed by the High/Scope Educational Research Foundation to assess the quality of structured youth programs, identify the training needs of staff, and guide program improvement efforts. There are versions for both elementary and secondary-aged youth. The tools are designed for use in a range of settings including schools, community organizations, and camps. PQA supplements are available for camps, health and wellness, STEM, academic, and arts programs. PQA was designed to be used within a larger continuous improvement system.

The Assessment of Afterschool Program Practices Tool (APT)  can be used by program staff for self-assessment or by external observers for program improvement purposes. The tool can also be used by trained external observers for program evaluation and accountability. The APT can be used in both structured and unstructured youth programs in a range of settings that serve youth in grades K-12. The program quality assessment tools are one component of NIOST’s program assessment system (APAS), a flexible system designed to help programs measure and link their program quality and youth outcomes. Note: although APT is free for use, programs must first receive training to gain access to the tool. On-site  training ranges from $4,600 to $10,000. NOIST expects to have an online training program available in 2015 that will cost $200 and will include one year of access to the tutorials.

The Out-of-School Time (OST) Observation Tool is grounded in the youth development literature, and, in particular, it assesses activities against the four SAFE features (sequenced, active, focused, and explicit) to contribute to positive outcomes for youth in out-of-school time programs. The tool should be used by trained observers to collect observational data to assess the quality of program activities. This data can be used to inform quality improvement efforts as well as for program monitoring and evaluation. The OST can be used in afterschool programs in school and community-based settings that serve youth in grades K-12. 

The Promising Practices Rating System (PPRS) should be used by trained observers to collect observational data to assess the quality of program activities. This data can be used to inform quality improvement efforts as well as for program monitoring and evaluation. The PPRS can be used in afterschool programs in both school and community-based settings that serve youth in grades K-8. The PPRS observation instrument assesses point-of-service quality and is used in conjunction with the survey measures completed by program staff and youth participants, which provide information on both point-of-service quality and program management quality. Training in the PPRS is limited to individuals involved in research studies using the instrument.

 


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